How To Downgrade The iOS 7 Beta Back To iOS 6 The Easy Way – ReadWrite


http://readwrite.com/2013/06/13/how-to-downgrade-from-ios-7-beta-back-to-ios-6#disqus_anchor&awesm=~ocS2CVXpn8lQfM

How To Downgrade The iOS 7 Beta Back To iOS 6 The Easy Way

How To Downgrade The iOS 7 Beta Back To iOS 6 The Easy Way

Upgrading to iOS 7 is a pretty painless process. All that’s required is an Apple Developer account and the time it takes to download the install file. Going back, however, isn’t quite so easy.

Unlike instances in the past where upgrading to Apple’s new beta OS was a one-way road – which will likely be the case again once iOS 7 is released to the world at large – you can in fact still revert back to iOS 6 if you’ve upgraded to the iOS 7 beta.

If you’re like me, you may have thrown caution to the winds by loading iOS 7 on your iPhone without much more than a vague hope that you could restore it to its prior (and fully functioning) glory. Fortunately, it’s a lot easier than various online guides are making it out to be.

Step 1: Download The Proper iOS 6 File

In order to install iOS 6, you must pick the proper version or iTunes will spit an error back at you. For the iPhone 5, you must download iOS 6.1.4. For everything else, it is iOS 6.1.3. If you use the wrong file for your device, iTunes will not allow you to restore it.

To review:

Step 2: Plug The Device Into Your Computer, Cancel The iTunes Automatic Sync Process (If It Starts)

When plugging in your smartphone back into your computer, the iPhone may begin syncing its data with iTunes. This could happen even if you had previously had it set to manual sync. This could be problematic if iTunes tries to make a new backup of your device with iOS 7.

You should cancel the sync just to be safe. While I did not let it happen with my device, having an iOS 7 backup could supersede your old backups and keep you from restoring your phone as it was in iOS 6 with all your content – apps, settings, music, photos – intact. Despite that, you should still be able to, at the very least, setup the device as a new iPhone.

Step 3: Do Not Put Your Device Into DFU Mode, Just Hit Restore

The popular notion when downgrading from iOS 7 to iOS 6 is to put you iPhone into DFU (Download Firmware Update) mode, which is Apple’s version of recovery mode for iDevices. It turns out that this is completely unnecessary and your iPhone can be downgraded without that extra effort.

To put your iPhone in DFU mode:

  • Hold down the home and power button for 10 seconds.
  • Release the power button while continuing to hold the home button for eight seconds.

(Read more: Apple’s New iOS 7: What You Need To Know Now)

This process sets up your phone automatically for a restore. It is not technically required to downgrade to iOS 6. At the same time, using DFU mode will not have any negative effect on restoring to iOS 6. You can use it if it makes you comfortable.

Once your iPhone is recognized by iTunes, simply hold the Alt/Option button on a Mac or the shift key on a Windows machine and click “Restore iPhone…” The option to choose the iOS6 .ipsw file will pop up, the same way it does when upgrading to iOS 7.

Find the proper file, click it and wait. If you don’t hit any annoying road blocks, your device should be back on the iOS 6 train. At this point, choose to restore it from a backup and pick your most recent iOS 6 backup. Hopefully, you made that backup the same day you took the iOS 7 plunge.

A Special Case: iTunes Error 3194

If you run into an error immediately following the process of the restore where iTunes says it’s verifying your iPhone’s eligibility, you might have simply downloaded the wrong iOS 6 file, noted above.

But if you’re absolutely sure you have the right file, then you may just be running into a common iTunes error. Cult of Mac detailed how to fix it.

Here’s the step-by-step breakdown:

  • Navigate to the Finder, and select Go in the menu bar
  • Click ‘Go to Folder…’
  • Type ‘/etc’ and find the ‘hosts’ file
  • Copy the ‘hosts’ file and paste it your desktop, then open it in Text Edit
  • At the very bottom of the file, find a line that reads, “74.208.105.171 gs.apple.com” and delete it
  • Drop that file back into the ‘/etc’ folder, choose replace (your Mac may ask you to authenticate the decision).
  • Go back to iTunes restore using the methods described above

Let us know in the comments if you successfully downgraded from Apple’s newest beta. And don’t hesitate to let us know if you used a different method from the one described here to downgrade from iOS 7 to iOS 6.

Advertisements
By Reda Bouaichi Posted in Tech, tips Tagged

What Every CEO Needs to Know About the Cloud – Harvard Business Review


http://alturl.com/miw5i

November 2011

In 2010 an IBM survey of more than 1,500 CEOs worldwide revealed a troubling gap: Close to 80% of them believed their environment would grow much more complex in the coming years, but fewer than half thought their companies were well equipped to deal with this shift. The survey team called it “the largest leadership challenge identified in eight years of research.”

Unfortunately, the information technology infrastructure at many large companies only makes this challenge more difficult. Their technology environments actually impede their ability to sense change and respond quickly. While there is no simple fix for this problem, help is at hand in the form of cloud computing, a new suite of digital tools and approaches.

Cloud computing is a sharp departure from the status quo. Today most companies own their software and hardware and keep them “on premise” in data centers and other specialized facilities. With cloud computing, in contrast, companies lease their digital assets, and their employees don’t know the location of the computers, data centers, applications, and databases that they’re using. These resources are just “in the cloud” somewhere.

To advocates of cloud computing, that’s the whole point. Customers don’t have to concern themselves with details; they just rent what they need from the cloud. (For a more detailed explanation, see the sidebar “What Is the Cloud?”)

How important is cloud computing? I would argue that it’s a sea change—a deep and permanent shift in how computing power is generated and consumed. It’s as inevitable and irreversible as the shift from steam to electric power in manufacturing, which was gaining momentum in America about a century ago. And just as that transition brought many benefits and opened up new possibilities to factory owners, so too will the cloud confer advantages on its adopters.

At present, there’s a lot of uncertainty and skepticism around the cloud, particularly among technology professionals who have deep expertise with, or attachment to, on-premise computing. Companies shouldn’t give such people too much influence over plans to move into the cloud; that would be like putting the crew that ran the boiler and steam turbine in charge of electrifying a factory. The CEO and other senior business executives need to take responsibility for bringing their organizations into the era of cloud computing.

When I talk to executives about the cloud, three questions always come up: Why will the cloud be a big deal beyond the IT department? What are the main concerns and areas of skepticism, and how valid are they? And how should we get started? In this article I’ll address those questions. I’ll explain the cloud and its benefits, highlight how perceived barriers and other concerns will keep many companies from taking full advantage of it, discuss the implications of various responses, and recommend actions.

The Benefits of the Cloud

Some people maintain that there’s nothing magic about the cloud—that anything it can do, on-premise approaches can also accomplish. That argument is correct in theory, at least for large companies that can afford comprehensive enterprise software and top IT talent. Such companies can buy or build software for collaboration or analytics—or anything else—and install it in their own data centers. They can enable these applications for different devices—desktops, laptops, tablets, and smartphones—and make them accessible to employees at home and on the road via web browsers. They can also open this infrastructure to people outside the organization, such as contractors, suppliers, and joint venture partners.

Regards,Reda Bouaichi

The fight gets technical: mobile apps vs. mobile sites | Econsultancy


http://econsultancy.com/us/blog/7832-the-fight-gets-technical-mobile-apps-vs-mobile-sites

The fight gets technical: mobile apps vs. mobile sites

Posted 28 July 2011 11:10am by Jake Hird with 7 comments

This article is the second in a series of extracts taken from Econsultancy’s new Internet Marketing Strategy Briefing. The free-to-download report covers the most important online trends in digital marketing that we are witnessing.

Topics covered within the document include customer centricity, channel diversification, data, social media and content strategy.

This extract, written by Econsultancy’s Research Manager, Aliya Zaidi, focuses on the more technical aspects in the continuing battle between mobile apps and mobile sites.

Channel diversification

Clearly the proliferation, and fragmentation, of customer touch points and channels, isn’t slowing down. We feel it is safe to say that 2011 is, indeed, finally the ‘year of mobile’, with both smartphone and tablet device usage fast growing.

However, ‘Connected TV’, which promises any brand ‘access to the living room’ via the TV, is looking to become a reality in 2012 in some countries with many brands building capabilities now.

Quite apart from the commercial and regulatory challenges, it is a big operational and technical challenge to deliver a joined up brand experience across all these interactive channels.

The end goal is likely to be a single web platform that can deliver device-specific, personalised, experiences across all these channels; shorter term expediency means ‘silos’, across people, process and technology, are being created in an attempt to ‘deliver something’ and learn in the process.

A key issue for companies is the mobile versus app debate, and whether there is an argument for producing a mobile application over a mobile site.

There are clear arguments for both applications and mobile sites. While some companies believe that mobile development priorities should be focused on either a mobile site or an application, the reality is that consumers are using both channels, so an integrated approach is the optimal solution.

The use of smartphones have proliferated in the last year, which means that there are far more opportunities to reach consumers via a mobile app.

According to Olswang, 22% of UK consumers already have a smartphone, with this percentage rising to 31% among 24-35 year olds. According to research from Gartner smartphone sales globally will reach 467m in 2011.

Smartphones are becoming increasingly sophisticated with a growing number of features, which means consumers are now engaging with brands via multiple channels on their phones.

It is important to distinguish which type of solution best suits the needs of the company. There are three types of mobile applications: native apps, web apps, and hybrid solutions.

Native apps are programmed using Objective C on the iPhone or using Java on Android devices.

  • Native apps make use of all the phone’s features, such as the mobile phone camera, geolocation, and the user’s address book.
  • Native apps do not need to be connected to the internet to be used.
  • A native app is specific to the mobile handset it is run on, since it uses the features of that specific handset.
  • Native apps can be distributed on the phone’s marketplace (e.g. Apple Store for iPhone or Ovi store for Nokia handsets).

Web apps run in the phone’s browser.

  • This means the app works across all devices, and ensures cross-platform compatibility.
  • The same base code can be used to support all devices, including iPhone and Android.
  • However, web apps do not make use of the phone’s other features, such as the camera or geolocation.
  • Web apps cannot be deployed to the phone’s marketplace.

Hybrid mobile apps are a mix between these two types of mobile applications.

  • Using a development framework, companies can develop cross-platform applications that use web technologies (such as HTML, JavaScript and CSS), while still accessing the phone’s features.
  • A hybrid app is a native app with embedded HTML.
  • Selected portions of the app are written using web technologies.
  • The web portions can be downloaded from the web, or packaged within the app.
  • This option allows companies to reap all the benefits of native apps while ensuring longevity associated with well-established web technologies.
  • The Facebook app is an example of a hybrid app; it is downloaded from the app store and has all the features of a native app, but requires updates from the web to function.

Advantages and disadvantages of native mobile applications

There is evidence to show that smartphone users are more affluent and have a higher disposable income. According to a study about smartphone users from Ask.com and Harris Interactive, the most affluent respondents in the survey were most likely to say they had downloaded an app.

Native apps also have better functionality. Because they use the features of the smartphones, such as the camera phone, the user’s address book, geolocation and augmented reality, companies can offer a richer, more immersive experience.

Native apps do not need necessarily to be connected to the internet to be used. Since they make use of the phone’s functionality, they can work in offline mode when there is no internet connection. However, some apps may require an internet connection, depending on functionality and available data.

In terms of distribution, native apps get good visibility with consumers because they are distributed through the phone manufacturer’s app store. This also means that they have an in-built revenue model, since consumers may have to pay to download the app.

The decision to create an application or not depends on the nature of the company and its products and services. If there are a significant proportion of customers using smartphones and mobile apps, then there is a case for investing in app development.

It is also important to consider which platform customers are mostly using. To maximise the number of consumers reached through an application, it is important to create an app for different mobile handsets, to ensure compatibility with the widest range of handsets.

The disadvantage of native mobile apps is that it can restrict the number of users that can be reached, if the app is not compatible with all handsets. It also requires additional development time as different apps need to be developed for each type of platform.

Third-party approval can also be another barrier. As the app will be distributed through the phone’s store, companies need to wait for approval before the app is released, and this can be a time-consuming process. In addition, if the app is not approved, there is usually little, if any feedback on why it was rejected.

Advantages of mobile web applications

The main advantage of a web app is that it is compatible across all platforms and devices. As the application runs in the browser, it is independent of the handset it is run on. This means that the web app has effectively more reach, and that only one app has to be designed for several handsets.

Web apps make use of existing web technologies, such as Java and CSS, which means the technical barriers to entry are low. Developers can use their existing skills to develop a web app, whereas native apps may require additional training given that the technologies are newer.

Companies can also make use of mobile search to allow their consumers to find the app. Native apps need to be downloaded in advance to be used, whereas web apps can be found and used simply through a search on the browser.

Because the app is not distributed through the phone’s store, no third-party approval is required before release. The site can be updated in real-time and changed without requiring sign-off by the mobile provider.

There is also some evidence to suggest that browser-based mobile applications will grow faster than the app market, which may bode well for a long-term strategy.

Which is the right approach?

To cover all bases, it is important to recognise that consumers are not using these channels in a mutually exclusive manner. They are using both native applications and browser-based apps, so the best strategy is to develop both types.

The decision to invest in an app or in a mobile website depends on the company’s target audience and the functionality of the app. Companies also need to consider time, budget and resources to develop each solution.

Native, web or hybrid mobile app development?


Source: Worklight

An inherent trade-off


Source: Worklight

Case study: The Financial Times vs. Apple

Another good example of a hybrid mobile app is the Financial Times mobile web application. Many publishers are unhappy that Apple plans to retain 30% of the revenue from the subscriptions sold on iTunes and to keep customer data from the sales.

To get around this, The Financial Times designed a new app that includes much of the functionality of an iPhone or iPad app, but can be deployed within the browser.

The web app uses the web technology standard, HTML5, which allows developers to create a single application that can be run on a variety of devices, while also making use of the benefits of native mobile apps.

Although the Financial Times uses both native mobile apps and web apps, the newspaper is encouraging its users to migrate to the new web app to circumvent Apple’s app store terms and conditions. Mobile customers currently make up 15% of the FT’s digital subscriber growth, and a large proportion of them are iPhone or iPad users.

While this is a risky strategy, publishers can collect 100% of their revenue via a web app, while 30% of the revenue generated through the native would be collected by Apple.

A key advantage of native apps is that they can be given a high profile within the app store. However, in the case of the FT, their brand is strong enough that users will remember to visit the website, and the FT may not need the extra exposure the app store provides. Employing a multichannel approach also means that the FT is not reliant on a single channel.

Jake Hird is a Senior Research Analyst for Econsultancy. Follow him on Twitter, connect with him on LinkedIn or see what he’s keeping an eye on via Retaggr.

By Reda Bouaichi Posted in Tech, web

Apple Poised to Become World’s Top-Selling PC Vendor with Tablets Included


Apple Poised to Become World’s Top-Selling PC Vendor with Tablets Included
TOP TECHNOLOGY STORIES | NOVEMBER 21, 2011
http://www.macrumors.com/2011/11/21/apple-poised-to-become-worlds-top-selling-pc-vendor-with-tablets-included/

white_ipad_2_oblique.jpg
Research firm Canalys today noted that Apple appears set to become the world’s largest PC manufacturer by volume if the iPad … Read more

By Reda Bouaichi Posted in Tech